Today: 17.Aug.2019

Bonne Posma, physicist, Chairman, Nuclear Africa (Pty) Ltd, Founder, Saminco (USA) specializing in electric propulsion systems for off-road vehicles and underground mining conveyances. Comments by John Droz, physicist, Jon Boone, wind energy expert, Eric Jelinski nuclear and wind energy expert: Newly elected leaders in South Africa are changing the energy plan now aiming to use massive amounts of wind and solar energy instead of additional nuclear power. South Africa is unique in the world in having outstanding experience with nuclear power and production of radioisotopes for nuclear medicine. it has some of the world's top experts in nuclear energy. This paper discusses the technical consequences of using wind and solar instead of nuclear. South Africa will squander the expertise they have that can help all of Africa. Political and business lobbying with elected officials will have terrible consequences, when elected officials don't care to understand the technologies they are deciding on.

Published in Several energy types

Jeff Johnson, Chemical & Engineering News: The U.S. appears to be witnessing the slow death of nuclear power. Plants are aging out and retiring, and their place in the electricity marketplace is being captured by cheaper, simpler, and less controversial sources—particularly natural gas plants and renewable energy sources such as wind and solar.

Published in Nuclear

Senator Lisa Murkowski, Alaska: As our nuclear leadership declines, we are simultaneously losing our ability to influence security and nonproliferation decisions. Taking our place — but not always sharing our views — are countries that could put world security interests at risk. After inventing commercial nuclear power, the U.S. has now clearly fallen behind. Yet we can still turn the tide and restore our influence, particularly if we pursue the development of advanced reactors.

Clinton Crackel, Co-Founder, Nuclear Fuels Reprocessing Coalition: According to the EIA, as of 2017 in the U.S., nuclear power on the utility scale has the highest average capacity factor (reliability, also stated as CF) of 92%, while geothermal is rated at 76.4% and coal is rated at 53.5%. The optimum CFs for wind, solar photovoltaic (PV) and concentrated solar power (CSP) are 36.7%, 27% and 21.8%, respectively.

Published in Several energy types

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