Today: 07.Dec.2019

Sebastian Luening, paleogeologist: Leben wir in einer klimatisch außergewöhnlichen Zeit, die alles Vorherige in den Schatten stellt? Dafür muss man in die klimatische Vergangenheit schauen. Anhänger des Klimaalarmismus beschränken sich dabei auf die letzte 150 Jahre und kommen zu dem vorschnellen aber persönlich erhebenden Schluss: Ja, wir sind Teil einer Entwicklung die es noch nie gegegben hat, und wir sind auch noch selber Schuld daran. Wir mächtigen Menschen haben es geschafft, uns das Klima Untertan zu machen.

Edgar Ocampo Tellez: • Decir que las fuentes renovables de energía son inagotables es falso: tienen limitantes técnicas, físicas, y problemas de intermitencia. • El aumento exponencial de consumo de energía es muy reciente. Surge después de la Segunda Guerra Mundial. En los últimos ocho mil años la humanidad estuvo conformada por menos de 300 millones de habitantes, pero hoy somos siete mil millones. El potencial renovable de nuestro territorio es de 44 terawatts de energía hidráulica, 87 de eólica, 200 de solar y 52 de geotérmica; en total, 400 terawatts hora anuales; pero nos faltarían 600 más. “Ése es el predicamento en el que se encuentra el modelo energético mexicano, y no es de fácil solución”.

Published in Several energy types

Mark Mills, economics21.org: Not satisfied with the mere claim that solar and wind are reaching parity with the costs of conventional energy technologies, green enthusiasts are upping the ante claiming that by “2030, the cost [of solar] could be so near to zero it will effectively be free.” But no amount of research or torturing of reality, however, will lead to that result. Both physics and history offer instructive lessons. That scenario has played out in Germany and Britain, both far further down the green path, leading to radically higher electricity prices there — 200% to 300% higher than in America.

Published in Wind and Solar

Bjorn Lomborg - When a “solution” to a problem causes more damage than the problem, policymaking has gone awry. That’s where we often find ourselves with global warming today. Actihttp://www.efn-usa.org/administrator/index.php?option=com_k2&view=itemsvist organizations like Worldwatch argue that higher temperatures will make more people hungry, so drastic carbon cuts are needed. But a comprehensive new study published in Nature Climate Change led by researchers from the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis has found that strong global climate action would cause far more hunger and food insecurity than climate change itself.

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