Today: 06.Dec.2019

David R. Grimes,physicist and cancer researcher at Oxford University. Thirty years has passed since events in Chernobyl, while Japan marks the fifth anniversary of the Fukushima disaster. We need more than ever to have a reasoned discussion on the issues. It is important also to see these disasters in the wider context of energy production: when the Banqiao hydroelectric dam failed in China in 1975 it led to at least 171000 deaths and displaced 11 million people. Our reliance on fossil fuels is particularly costly, not only to the environment but to human health; each year, at least 1.3 million people are estimated to die from air pollution. Shutdown of the plants in Japan has led to not only increased pollution, but rolling blackouts and protests. By contrast, France has for decades produced 75% of its energy through nuclear, and enjoys the cleanest air and among the lowest carbon emissions of any industrialised nature.

Published in Nuclear

Don Robertson is the retired Managing Director of NTP Radioisotopes SOC Ltd of South Africa. This article is very important because it gives a summary of the worldwide problems facing the production of the the radioisotope, Mo-99. This isotope is the workhorse of diagnostic nuclear medicine, used in approximately 80,000 Tc-99m scans per day. A variety of policies and regulations result in restricting full cost recovery for producers of this vital radioisotope. For all newsletters, see website: http://wci-ici.org/

Alan Waltar, Author of "radiation and Modern Life: Fulfilling Marie Curie's Dream" and James Katzaroff, CEO of Advanced Medical Isotopes Corp., World Council on Isotopes. By 2004, two-thirds of the elements in the Periodic Table had produced at least one commercially utilized radioisotope: 63 for medicine, 27 for industry, 31 for environmental protection. For nuclear medicine, 10% of the radioisotopes were used in therapy and 90% in diagnostics. This report examines the progress in the last ten years. For all newsletters, see website: http://wci-ici.org/

John Shanahan, Civil Engineer, initiated a letter to John Holdren, Director of Office of Science and Technology Policy, The White House, dated Feb. 1, 2010. The letter made three recommendations. See his reply. Search keywords "Holdren reply".

1) We believe it’s imperative to accelerate the licensing and building of the kind of reactors now in use, commonly called thermal reactors.

2) Along with the critical need for nuclear energy is the urgent call for the isotopes of nuclear medicine.

3) Development of fourth-generation nuclear reactors will be needed if nuclear power is to expand significantly beyond its present market penetration

Published in Uranium fueled

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